Author Topic: Is It Always N Behavior to Violate Others' Boundaries?  (Read 622177 times)

BonesMS

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Re: Is It Always N Behavior to Violate Others' Boundaries?
« Reply #8040 on: September 12, 2017, 07:08:49 AM »
https://www.reddit.com/r/JUSTNOMIL/comments/6zk7um/dh_is_veras_tech_support/?sort=new

These N's think they can do whatever the F**K they want!!!  F**K THAT NOISE! 
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Twoapenny

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Re: Is It Always N Behavior to Violate Others' Boundaries?
« Reply #8041 on: September 17, 2017, 04:50:56 AM »
https://www.reddit.com/r/JUSTNOMIL/comments/6zk7um/dh_is_veras_tech_support/?sort=new

These N's think they can do whatever the F**K they want!!!  F**K THAT NOISE!

It's so sad reading things like this, these are the times when really all you can do is refuse to open the door or very clearly say 'NO' and stick to it.  The selfishness and sense of entitlement is astonishing.

On a slightly different topic, I was reading about a situation on another forum regarding a family who have sold their home, subject to contract.  Their buyers have been inundating them with demands about things they want removing or leaving, things they want changing and arguing over moving dates, to the point that the sellers are considering putting it back on the market.  I just don't understand how people can so blindly insist on what they want without any regard for anyone else.  Truly baffling. xx

BonesMS

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Re: Is It Always N Behavior to Violate Others' Boundaries?
« Reply #8042 on: September 17, 2017, 07:07:26 AM »
https://www.reddit.com/r/JUSTNOMIL/comments/6zk7um/dh_is_veras_tech_support/?sort=new

These N's think they can do whatever the F**K they want!!!  F**K THAT NOISE!

It's so sad reading things like this, these are the times when really all you can do is refuse to open the door or very clearly say 'NO' and stick to it.  The selfishness and sense of entitlement is astonishing.

On a slightly different topic, I was reading about a situation on another forum regarding a family who have sold their home, subject to contract.  Their buyers have been inundating them with demands about things they want removing or leaving, things they want changing and arguing over moving dates, to the point that the sellers are considering putting it back on the market.  I just don't understand how people can so blindly insist on what they want without any regard for anyone else.  Truly baffling. xx

It is truly baffling.  Unfortunately, these N's don't see people as PEOPLE.  N's think they are ENTITLED to USE others as objects and tools for their own self-gratification.  UGH!!!
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BonesMS

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Re: Is It Always N Behavior to Violate Others' Boundaries?
« Reply #8043 on: October 16, 2017, 05:06:06 PM »
Just gotta vent!

Hyacinth Bucket, of Keeping Up Appearances, the Brit-Com is FUNNY!!!

A real-life Hyacinth Bucket attempting to force Keeping Up Appearances according to HER standards is tiresome!  I think I managed to nip that nonsense in the bud!  BUH-BYE!
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BonesMS

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Re: Is It Always N Behavior to Violate Others' Boundaries?
« Reply #8044 on: October 16, 2017, 06:14:32 PM »
I knew that sooner or later, as I continued digging into genealogy, that I was going to find some Black Sheep and skeletons hiding in the closet!  I had NO idea who they were going to be!

One of the Black Sheep turned up on the maternal side of the family tree.  As I'm researching, the name of "Samuel Mudd Blandford" popped up and subsequent research had his family living in the same region as the infamous Doctor Samuel A. Mudd.  Turns out that Samuel Mudd Blandford and Doctor Samuel A. Mudd are, in fact, related to each other and that they are maternal cousins!

The other Black Sheep turned up this past Saturday while I was taking a tour of the Surratt House in what was formerly Surrattsville.  The docent was explaining what happened with the Surratt Family while they were living there and the question came up regarding what happened to the family after Mary Surratt was executed.  Turns out that one of the Surratt sons, John Harrison Surratt, Jr. married a relative of Francis Scott Key.  Francis Scott Key is related to my Dad via marriage which would also make the Surratts related too! 

So now I have found at least two Black Sheep!  Who knew?!?!?!?
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Twoapenny

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Re: Is It Always N Behavior to Violate Others' Boundaries?
« Reply #8045 on: October 22, 2017, 03:05:02 PM »
I knew that sooner or later, as I continued digging into genealogy, that I was going to find some Black Sheep and skeletons hiding in the closet!  I had NO idea who they were going to be!

One of the Black Sheep turned up on the maternal side of the family tree.  As I'm researching, the name of "Samuel Mudd Blandford" popped up and subsequent research had his family living in the same region as the infamous Doctor Samuel A. Mudd.  Turns out that Samuel Mudd Blandford and Doctor Samuel A. Mudd are, in fact, related to each other and that they are maternal cousins!

The other Black Sheep turned up this past Saturday while I was taking a tour of the Surratt House in what was formerly Surrattsville.  The docent was explaining what happened with the Surratt Family while they were living there and the question came up regarding what happened to the family after Mary Surratt was executed.  Turns out that one of the Surratt sons, John Harrison Surratt, Jr. married a relative of Francis Scott Key.  Francis Scott Key is related to my Dad via marriage which would also make the Surratts related too! 

So now I have found at least two Black Sheep!  Who knew?!?!?!?

Wow, Bonesie, well I guess a family isn't a family without some Black Sheep!  I didn't know you used that expression over there as well :)  It's amazing how the links follow through once you start digging :) xx

BonesMS

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Re: Is It Always N Behavior to Violate Others' Boundaries?
« Reply #8046 on: October 23, 2017, 02:13:19 AM »
I knew that sooner or later, as I continued digging into genealogy, that I was going to find some Black Sheep and skeletons hiding in the closet!  I had NO idea who they were going to be!

One of the Black Sheep turned up on the maternal side of the family tree.  As I'm researching, the name of "Samuel Mudd Blandford" popped up and subsequent research had his family living in the same region as the infamous Doctor Samuel A. Mudd.  Turns out that Samuel Mudd Blandford and Doctor Samuel A. Mudd are, in fact, related to each other and that they are maternal cousins!

The other Black Sheep turned up this past Saturday while I was taking a tour of the Surratt House in what was formerly Surrattsville.  The docent was explaining what happened with the Surratt Family while they were living there and the question came up regarding what happened to the family after Mary Surratt was executed.  Turns out that one of the Surratt sons, John Harrison Surratt, Jr. married a relative of Francis Scott Key.  Francis Scott Key is related to my Dad via marriage which would also make the Surratts related too! 

So now I have found at least two Black Sheep!  Who knew?!?!?!?

Wow, Bonesie, well I guess a family isn't a family without some Black Sheep!  I didn't know you used that expression over there as well :)  It's amazing how the links follow through once you start digging :) xx

LOL!!!

Funny how some colloquialisms pop up in both British and American English.

Now I'm wondering what other Black Sheep are going to turn up or what other skeletons I'm going to find hiding in the closet?
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Twoapenny

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Re: Is It Always N Behavior to Violate Others' Boundaries?
« Reply #8047 on: October 23, 2017, 03:08:32 AM »
I knew that sooner or later, as I continued digging into genealogy, that I was going to find some Black Sheep and skeletons hiding in the closet!  I had NO idea who they were going to be!

One of the Black Sheep turned up on the maternal side of the family tree.  As I'm researching, the name of "Samuel Mudd Blandford" popped up and subsequent research had his family living in the same region as the infamous Doctor Samuel A. Mudd.  Turns out that Samuel Mudd Blandford and Doctor Samuel A. Mudd are, in fact, related to each other and that they are maternal cousins!

The other Black Sheep turned up this past Saturday while I was taking a tour of the Surratt House in what was formerly Surrattsville.  The docent was explaining what happened with the Surratt Family while they were living there and the question came up regarding what happened to the family after Mary Surratt was executed.  Turns out that one of the Surratt sons, John Harrison Surratt, Jr. married a relative of Francis Scott Key.  Francis Scott Key is related to my Dad via marriage which would also make the Surratts related too! 

So now I have found at least two Black Sheep!  Who knew?!?!?!?

Wow, Bonesie, well I guess a family isn't a family without some Black Sheep!  I didn't know you used that expression over there as well :)  It's amazing how the links follow through once you start digging :) xx

LOL!!!

Funny how some colloquialisms pop up in both British and American English.

Now I'm wondering what other Black Sheep are going to turn up or what other skeletons I'm going to find hiding in the closet?

Well I think we can safely say you have inherited the genes of the good ones, not the dodgy ones :) xx xx xx

BonesMS

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Re: Is It Always N Behavior to Violate Others' Boundaries?
« Reply #8048 on: October 23, 2017, 03:51:39 AM »
I knew that sooner or later, as I continued digging into genealogy, that I was going to find some Black Sheep and skeletons hiding in the closet!  I had NO idea who they were going to be!

One of the Black Sheep turned up on the maternal side of the family tree.  As I'm researching, the name of "Samuel Mudd Blandford" popped up and subsequent research had his family living in the same region as the infamous Doctor Samuel A. Mudd.  Turns out that Samuel Mudd Blandford and Doctor Samuel A. Mudd are, in fact, related to each other and that they are maternal cousins!

The other Black Sheep turned up this past Saturday while I was taking a tour of the Surratt House in what was formerly Surrattsville.  The docent was explaining what happened with the Surratt Family while they were living there and the question came up regarding what happened to the family after Mary Surratt was executed.  Turns out that one of the Surratt sons, John Harrison Surratt, Jr. married a relative of Francis Scott Key.  Francis Scott Key is related to my Dad via marriage which would also make the Surratts related too! 

So now I have found at least two Black Sheep!  Who knew?!?!?!?

Wow, Bonesie, well I guess a family isn't a family without some Black Sheep!  I didn't know you used that expression over there as well :)  It's amazing how the links follow through once you start digging :) xx

LOL!!!

Funny how some colloquialisms pop up in both British and American English.

Now I'm wondering what other Black Sheep are going to turn up or what other skeletons I'm going to find hiding in the closet?

Well I think we can safely say you have inherited the genes of the good ones, not the dodgy ones :) xx xx xx

LOL!!!!

Thanks!

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BonesMS

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Re: Is It Always N Behavior to Violate Others' Boundaries?
« Reply #8049 on: November 05, 2017, 12:11:42 PM »
My former sister-in-law posted this on Facebook and it showed up in my Newsfeed:

"Always remember people will come and go, but you only have one MOTHER forever!
Love her always because there will come a day when she won’t be here to hold....."

My response:

BonesMS:

"Unless you deal with the dysfunctional one that screwed up your ex-husband."

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Twoapenny

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Re: Is It Always N Behavior to Violate Others' Boundaries?
« Reply #8050 on: November 06, 2017, 04:01:08 AM »
My former sister-in-law posted this on Facebook and it showed up in my Newsfeed:

"Always remember people will come and go, but you only have one MOTHER forever!
Love her always because there will come a day when she won’t be here to hold....."

My response:

BonesMS:

"Unless you deal with the dysfunctional one that screwed up your ex-husband."

Aw, Bones, it's always sad when those sort of blanket, Hallmark type sentiments get posted because it's patently untrue for so many people.  Someone I know posted something similar recently and it was sad/frightening/surprising to read how many comments basically saying what you've said; not everyone's a saint, not everyone has good relationships and some people are just too unhealthy to be around.  What was equally surprising was the number of people posting who were astonished to hear people saying negative things about their families: I guess if you're lucky enough to grow up in a loving family it's hard to imagine not having that.

Funnily enough I was thinking about you this morning :)  There's a programme here called 'Who Do You Think You Are', where famous people trace back their family trees.  There's a guy called 'Shovel' who's the drummer with a band called M People (I don't know if they got famous in the States) but in it he talks about growing up as a black child in a white family in the sixties and seventies and therefore always assuming he'd been adopted, although it was never talked about.  He had a really happy, loving childhood, lovely parents and has nothing but good to say about them, but in his thirties he found out his adopted mum was actually his birth mother.  She'd had a fling with a guy at work and he was the result of it.  Initially he'd been put up for adoption but then his parents decided to get him back and raise him themselves - apparently the first his dad knew of the affair was when he got to the hospital and found his wife cradling a black baby.  I guess she was hoping he was the father and would never know about the affair.  So they took him back and this guy raised him as his own, it was an emotional story, so much love and a sort of 'well let's get on with it' attitude.  Anyway, family trees - made me think of you! :) xx

BonesMS

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Re: Is It Always N Behavior to Violate Others' Boundaries?
« Reply #8051 on: November 06, 2017, 04:48:45 AM »
My former sister-in-law posted this on Facebook and it showed up in my Newsfeed:

"Always remember people will come and go, but you only have one MOTHER forever!
Love her always because there will come a day when she won’t be here to hold....."

My response:

BonesMS:

"Unless you deal with the dysfunctional one that screwed up your ex-husband."

Aw, Bones, it's always sad when those sort of blanket, Hallmark type sentiments get posted because it's patently untrue for so many people.  Someone I know posted something similar recently and it was sad/frightening/surprising to read how many comments basically saying what you've said; not everyone's a saint, not everyone has good relationships and some people are just too unhealthy to be around.  What was equally surprising was the number of people posting who were astonished to hear people saying negative things about their families: I guess if you're lucky enough to grow up in a loving family it's hard to imagine not having that.

Funnily enough I was thinking about you this morning :)  There's a programme here called 'Who Do You Think You Are', where famous people trace back their family trees.  There's a guy called 'Shovel' who's the drummer with a band called M People (I don't know if they got famous in the States) but in it he talks about growing up as a black child in a white family in the sixties and seventies and therefore always assuming he'd been adopted, although it was never talked about.  He had a really happy, loving childhood, lovely parents and has nothing but good to say about them, but in his thirties he found out his adopted mum was actually his birth mother.  She'd had a fling with a guy at work and he was the result of it.  Initially he'd been put up for adoption but then his parents decided to get him back and raise him themselves - apparently the first his dad knew of the affair was when he got to the hospital and found his wife cradling a black baby.  I guess she was hoping he was the father and would never know about the affair.  So they took him back and this guy raised him as his own, it was an emotional story, so much love and a sort of 'well let's get on with it' attitude.  Anyway, family trees - made me think of you! :) xx

Cool!!!

We have a USA version of "Who Do You Think You Are?" that started out on broadcast tv but switched to a cable channel later on.  (I can't afford cable so I can't watch it like I used to.)

Whenever anyone posts those "blanket" memes, I just cringe because that was NOT my reality growing up.  I had quite a long talk with my former sister-in-law several months ago where I described what that B!TCH did to both my NGCB and me.  I thought she understood what I told her but, given what she posted yesterday, apparently, she didn't.
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Twoapenny

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Re: Is It Always N Behavior to Violate Others' Boundaries?
« Reply #8052 on: November 08, 2017, 12:56:36 AM »
My former sister-in-law posted this on Facebook and it showed up in my Newsfeed:

"Always remember people will come and go, but you only have one MOTHER forever!
Love her always because there will come a day when she won’t be here to hold....."

My response:

BonesMS:

"Unless you deal with the dysfunctional one that screwed up your ex-husband."

Aw, Bones, it's always sad when those sort of blanket, Hallmark type sentiments get posted because it's patently untrue for so many people.  Someone I know posted something similar recently and it was sad/frightening/surprising to read how many comments basically saying what you've said; not everyone's a saint, not everyone has good relationships and some people are just too unhealthy to be around.  What was equally surprising was the number of people posting who were astonished to hear people saying negative things about their families: I guess if you're lucky enough to grow up in a loving family it's hard to imagine not having that.

Funnily enough I was thinking about you this morning :)  There's a programme here called 'Who Do You Think You Are', where famous people trace back their family trees.  There's a guy called 'Shovel' who's the drummer with a band called M People (I don't know if they got famous in the States) but in it he talks about growing up as a black child in a white family in the sixties and seventies and therefore always assuming he'd been adopted, although it was never talked about.  He had a really happy, loving childhood, lovely parents and has nothing but good to say about them, but in his thirties he found out his adopted mum was actually his birth mother.  She'd had a fling with a guy at work and he was the result of it.  Initially he'd been put up for adoption but then his parents decided to get him back and raise him themselves - apparently the first his dad knew of the affair was when he got to the hospital and found his wife cradling a black baby.  I guess she was hoping he was the father and would never know about the affair.  So they took him back and this guy raised him as his own, it was an emotional story, so much love and a sort of 'well let's get on with it' attitude.  Anyway, family trees - made me think of you! :) xx

Cool!!!

We have a USA version of "Who Do You Think You Are?" that started out on broadcast tv but switched to a cable channel later on.  (I can't afford cable so I can't watch it like I used to.)

Whenever anyone posts those "blanket" memes, I just cringe because that was NOT my reality growing up.  I had quite a long talk with my former sister-in-law several months ago where I described what that B!TCH did to both my NGCB and me.  I thought she understood what I told her but, given what she posted yesterday, apparently, she didn't.

Ah, I know what you mean, Bones, and I must admit I do feel sad when I see those sort of 'My Mum is The Best Ever' type things because I'd love to be able to say that!  I do remember the first time I didn't buy her a Mother's Day card.  I'd really struggled for a couple of years because I didn't feel that any of the sentiments were appropriate and the first year that I didn't do it I felt really mean, largely because I knew how upset she would be.  But it just felt so false I couldn't bring myself to do it anymore.  I think maybe some of us need a meme that says "Look, I was fed and clothed but beyond that I mostly did it myself.  And I did a good job, too!"  Lol xx

BonesMS

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Re: Is It Always N Behavior to Violate Others' Boundaries?
« Reply #8053 on: November 08, 2017, 03:05:44 AM »
My former sister-in-law posted this on Facebook and it showed up in my Newsfeed:

"Always remember people will come and go, but you only have one MOTHER forever!
Love her always because there will come a day when she won’t be here to hold....."

My response:

BonesMS:

"Unless you deal with the dysfunctional one that screwed up your ex-husband."

Aw, Bones, it's always sad when those sort of blanket, Hallmark type sentiments get posted because it's patently untrue for so many people.  Someone I know posted something similar recently and it was sad/frightening/surprising to read how many comments basically saying what you've said; not everyone's a saint, not everyone has good relationships and some people are just too unhealthy to be around.  What was equally surprising was the number of people posting who were astonished to hear people saying negative things about their families: I guess if you're lucky enough to grow up in a loving family it's hard to imagine not having that.

Funnily enough I was thinking about you this morning :)  There's a programme here called 'Who Do You Think You Are', where famous people trace back their family trees.  There's a guy called 'Shovel' who's the drummer with a band called M People (I don't know if they got famous in the States) but in it he talks about growing up as a black child in a white family in the sixties and seventies and therefore always assuming he'd been adopted, although it was never talked about.  He had a really happy, loving childhood, lovely parents and has nothing but good to say about them, but in his thirties he found out his adopted mum was actually his birth mother.  She'd had a fling with a guy at work and he was the result of it.  Initially he'd been put up for adoption but then his parents decided to get him back and raise him themselves - apparently the first his dad knew of the affair was when he got to the hospital and found his wife cradling a black baby.  I guess she was hoping he was the father and would never know about the affair.  So they took him back and this guy raised him as his own, it was an emotional story, so much love and a sort of 'well let's get on with it' attitude.  Anyway, family trees - made me think of you! :) xx

Cool!!!

We have a USA version of "Who Do You Think You Are?" that started out on broadcast tv but switched to a cable channel later on.  (I can't afford cable so I can't watch it like I used to.)

Whenever anyone posts those "blanket" memes, I just cringe because that was NOT my reality growing up.  I had quite a long talk with my former sister-in-law several months ago where I described what that B!TCH did to both my NGCB and me.  I thought she understood what I told her but, given what she posted yesterday, apparently, she didn't.

Ah, I know what you mean, Bones, and I must admit I do feel sad when I see those sort of 'My Mum is The Best Ever' type things because I'd love to be able to say that!  I do remember the first time I didn't buy her a Mother's Day card.  I'd really struggled for a couple of years because I didn't feel that any of the sentiments were appropriate and the first year that I didn't do it I felt really mean, largely because I knew how upset she would be.  But it just felt so false I couldn't bring myself to do it anymore.  I think maybe some of us need a meme that says "Look, I was fed and clothed but beyond that I mostly did it myself.  And I did a good job, too!"  Lol xx

I like that meme!
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JustKathy

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Re: Is It Always N Behavior to Violate Others' Boundaries?
« Reply #8054 on: November 16, 2017, 02:55:15 PM »
Quote
"Always remember people will come and go, but you only have one MOTHER forever!
Love her always because there will come a day when she won’t be here to hold....."

I dread seeing these memes. There's always a bombardment of them around Mother's Day. I don't want to ruin a friend's thread with my true feelings, so find it best to avoid Facebook during that time. I have to sit on my hands and bite my tongue to stop myself from writing: "My mother is dead and burning in hell, and I'm HAPPY about it. Burn, witch, burn!" :P